Our award-winning, critically acclaimed videos include documentaries, narrative features, short fiction, animation, 'how-to' videos, and children's and young adult programs. Cinema Guild videos are suited for classroom instruction, curriculum enrichment, and professional training, and have broad general interest and entertainment appeal.To rent or purchase any of these titles, simply click on the "Place an Order" button next to the video and follow the instructions.

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African American Studies
African Studies
American History
Asian Studies
Balkan Studies
Cinema Studies
Dance
Disabilities
Entertainment
Fine Arts and Crafts
Gay Lesbian and Gender Studies
Gerontology and Aging
Holocaust Studies
Irish Studies
Jewish Studies
Latin American Studies
Literature and Language Arts
Mid East Studies
Performing Arts
Photography
Russian and Eastern Europe
Urban Studies
Women's studies

African American Studies

High Achievers
This video examines the training of young African Americans at the Health Professions Department at Morehouse College, the only all-black male college in America. The program features interviews with numerous Morehouse students as well as Morehouse educators, who have prepared more black males for medical school than any other college faculty, and who are striving to meet the pressing demand for more black medical professionals.
Directed by Rex Barnett
2001, color, 30 mins., VHS
Purchase: $99.95

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Journey to Justice
This video profiles the history of blacks in Canada and pays tribute to civil rights activists who struggled to change the country’s discriminatory laws. Focusing on the 1930s to the 1950s, the video weaves personal stories of these African-Canadians into a broader chronicle of the hardships and victories of their struggle for civil rights, one which closely parallels that of kindred spirits in the U.S. during the same period.
Those profiled include Fred Christie, denied service at a Montreal restaurant because of his skin color, who took his appeal all the way to the Supreme Court in 1936; Viola Desmond, a successful young entrepreneur, who insisted on keeping her seat in a ‘whites only’ area of a Nova Scotia movie theater in 1946; Hugh Burnette, who founded the National Unity Association in 1947 and pressured the Ontario government to uphold Fair Accommodations Practices laws; Bromley Armstrong, who was also involved in this historic battle, gathered evidence against discriminatory laws in Dresden, Ontario; Donald Willard Moore, who dedicated his life to reforming Canada’s biased immigration policy; and Stanley G. Grizzle, President of the Toronto division of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters, who organized the black delegation to ensure fair employment practices in Ontario.
Directed by Roger McTair
2000, color, 47 mins., VHS
Purchase: $275 Rental: $95

"…a well-researched film…recommended for the general public."—Library Journal

"…a very enjoyable and informative piece. For anyone needing a unique perspective on race relations in the mid-20th century, this expose on the plight of African-Canadians will be extremely useful."—School Library Journal
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African Studies

Hard Earth
Against the current political backdrop of attacks on white-owned farms in Zimbabwe, this documentary investigates what life is like on one of these occupied farm estates. It features interviews with commercial farmers, farm workers, land occupiers, and independence war veterans, all of whom relates stories of a divided society.
Directed by Mukundwa Francis Zvoma
2002, color, 58 mins., VHS
Purchase: $275 Rental: $85
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On the Border
The human tragedy caused by the widespread use of land mines in warfare is a growing problem throughout the world today. Children are especially susceptible to being maimed or killed by stepping on anti-personnel weapons buried during military conflicts many years ago. This documentary is a case study of the problem, focusing on the present efforts to demine the border areas in northeastern Zimbabwe, where more than twenty years ago mines were planted by the white-supremacist government of Rhodesia to prevent guerrilla attacks from Zambia. The video documents the dangerous work of the Zimbabweans and foreign nationals who enter the minefields to explode buried munitions, and shows the efforts of the National Mine Clearance Squadron to educate the local populace, especially children, about the dangers involved. It also features interviews with hospital workers who deal with this crisis and Zimbabweans who have been victimized by a long-forgotten war.
Directed by Tsitsi Dangarembga
2000, color, 45 mins., VHS
Purchase: $275 Rental: $75
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The Return: The N’Deup Healing Ceremony
In Senegal and throughout West Africa, illnesses are believed to be caused by supernatural external aggression. The diagnosis is made by a traditional healer, a shaman, whose job is to locate the then placate the spirts, the rab, that are responsible for the illness. The N’Deup healing ceremony shown in this video enlists the local community under the direction of the healer. Drumming, dancing, herbal cures, as well as ritual bloodletting, are employed in a dramatic effort to soothe and appease the agitated spirit. The goal of this complex and colorful ceremony is a return to the inner harmony the patient had earlier enjoyed.
Directed by Leslye Abbey
2001, color, 30 mins., VHS
Purchase: $175.00 Rental: $55


"…a remarkable film…professionals and students in the human services, who are desirous of becoming our shamans, will find the film intriguing and humbling."—Catherine P. Papell, MSW, DSW, CSW, Professor Erita, Adelphi University School of Social Work


"A fine, interesting film of a healing ritual in an African culture. Well edited, and compelling in its use of participant commentary and scholarly discussion."—Eric Greenleaf, Ph.D., Director, The Milton H. Erickson Institute
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South Africa: Beyond a Miracle
This video, part of a series of documentaries on conflict resolution in the world’s trouble spots, chronicles the evolution of South Africa from the tragic years of apartheid to the release of Nelson Mandela and the country’s first free elections in 1994, and, finally, to the cautious hopes and efforts today to build a strong democracy. Shot on location in Johannesburg, Pretoria, Capetown, Port Elizabeth and Durban, the video features interviews from witnesses, representing various geographical areas and professions, to the rebirth of South Africa.
Directed by John Michalczyk
2001, color, 55 mins., VHS
Purchase: $295 Rental: $95
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American History

The Brave Man
A humid August morning in Brooklyn. The year is 1776 and thirty-five thousand British regulars and Hessian mercenaries are bearing down upon George Washington's recently formed American army of twelve thousand men. The Revolution could be snuffed out before it has a chance to begin. The actions of one man, General William Alexander, leading a group of four hundred Maryland soldiers, prevented a decisive British victory that day. The Brave Man tells his story, which is also the story of the Battle of Brooklyn, one of the bloodiest but least-known conflicts of the War for Independence.
Shot with a limited budget and a caught-on-the-run style, The Brave Man employs maps, a fleet of red cars, a historic stone house, clever transitions between past and present, and a powerful, disbelief-suspending soundtrack. More than simply reenacting history, this innovative evokes it, asking the audience to imagine the fear, confusion, and courage of the men who fought and died. As the battle develops, the motives of William Alexander also emerge. A frustrated pretender to a Scottish Earldom, he has very personal and not-so-noble reasons for facing down the British. It is juxtapositions like this one—the personal vendetta with a national cause, a contemporary street corner with a colonial cannon—that make The Brave Man an unprecedented motion picture experience. It brings history alive for students in a way that's altogether new.
Directed by Joseph McCarthy
2001, color, 33 mins., VHS
Purchase: $250 Rental: $55


"…makes history come alive. History teachers in junior high school and above will want to use this video with classes studying the American Revolution, as well as New York history."—School Library Journal


"Alexander is posed against the backdrops of modern-day Brooklyn, an unusual but effective technique suggesting unseen links between past and present. Enhanced by an excellent musical score, this first-rate video is highly recommended for Revolutionary War collections, particularly in libraries serving the New York metropolitan area."—Library Journal
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Carnival Train
This documentary examines the unique American subculture of the carnival by chronicling an entire season of the James E. Strates Shows, one of the oldest carnivals in America, and the last to tour cities and towns throughout the U.S. by train. The video shows the entire process of setting up the carnival—a moveable city, complete with midway surrounded by rides, games and sideshows—its running for a week or more, and then the thirty-hour effort to dismantle the carnival for the move to the next city. It features interviews with the entire range of carnival employees, a community of workers and their families who live on the mile-long train, including the ride boys who set up and dismantle the amusement rides, the train crews who chain heavy equipment onto flat cars, the game operators, the food concessionaires, the entertainers, safety inspector, and the carnival bosses. The video also includes a brief history of carnivals, famous for their freak shows, striptease and oddity acts, which have largely vanished, and the continuing allure of this form of entertainment.
Directed by Matthew Barr
1999, color, 57 mins., VHS
Purchase: $275 Rental: $95
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Asian Studies

Bangkok Zigzag
This documentary portrays the lives of motorcycle taxi drivers who live and work out of a courtyard in a working-class neighborhood of Bangkok. Along with over 100 other drivers, most of them from rural areas of Thailand, they make their living by taxiing school children, market women, and businesspeople to and from their appointments. Astride Kawasakis and Hondas, they endure polluted air, dangerous driving conditions and threats from loan sharks in order to move customers through world-class traffic jams. In interviews, the men discuss their jobs, their family lives and the struggle to make ends meet, and their belief in guardian spirits, thereby revealing how traditional Thai values and lifestyles are being transformed by the forces of globalization.
Directed by Michael Dougherty and Robert Kirwan
2001, color, 50 mins., VHS
Purchase: $275 Rental: $85
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Balkan Studies

Prelude to Kosovo: War and Peace in Bosnia and Croatia
This video, part of a series of documentaries on conflict resolution in the world’s trouble spots, depicts the bitter civil war in the former Yugoslavia. Shot on location in Serbia, Croatia and Bosnia, the documentary combines graphic footage and interviews with religious and political figures. It examines the ideology of "ethnic cleansing" and the massacres resulting from a nationalist quest for political, cultural and religious domination. The Serbian Orthodox, Bosnian Muslim and Croatian Catholic perspectives are all represented.
Directed by John Michalczyk
1999, color 52 mins., VHS
Purchase: $275 Rental: $95
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Cinema Studies

A Galaxy Far, Far Away
This documentary investigates the pop-culture phenomenon generated by George Lucas’s Star Wars films, one which reached new peaks of excitement in the Spring of 1999, when the date for the theatrical premiere of the series’ ‘prequel,’, The Phantom Menace, was announced. As Star Wars fans all over the country began lining up at movie theaters weeks prior to its scheduled May 19th opening, filmmaker Tariq Jalil and his crew began documenting the frenzy in an attempt to understand the mysterious appeal of these films. In addition to interviewing hundreds of devoted fans—including many who remained on line for forty-two days in order to get a ticket to the premiere screening—as well as a few skeptics, they also spoke with film industry executives (including producer Roger Corman and story analyst Christopher Vogler), members of the media covering the event, Star Wars convention attendees, collectors lined up for a midnight opening of a Toys ‘r’ Us outlet selling action figures from the new film, as well as celebrities such as Joe Pesci, Andy Garcia, and Meat Loaf. More than just a geek show, however, A Galaxy Far, Far Away offers real insights into why the Star Wars films have generated a powerful and widespread cultural appeal that crosses racial, gender and generational lines.
Directed by Tariq Jalil
2001, color, 72 mins., VHS
Purchase: $295 Rental: $95


"…lively…enjoyable viewing."—Video

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Legacy of the Hollywood Blacklist
This documentary, hosted and narrated by Burt Lancaster, examines the effects of the highly publicized investigation of the motion picture industry by the House Committee on Un-American Activities (HUAC), which began in 1947. Many famous writers, directors, actors and producers, suspected of being Communists or having Communist "leanings," were called before the Committee to testify and many subsequently were blacklisted and lost their jobs. The video features archival footage of the hearings, interviews with blacklistees or their surviving family members, and examines the long-lasting effects that the HUAC hearings have had on the film industry, even today, and American society at large.
Directed by Judy Chaikin
1988, color and B&W, 52 mins., VHS
Purchase: $99.95
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Dance

Terpsichore’s Captives
This award-winning documentary follows a talented young Russian ballet student as her demanding and abusive dance instructor prepares her for an important competition. Indeed, it seems that sixty-year-old ballet teacher Ludmila Sakharova, Artist of the People, and her nineteen-year-old student, Natalia Balakhnecheva, are engaged in a duel to attain artistic perfection. Day in and day out, the older woman fiercely coaches her young pupil, never once sparing her pride or dignity. It soon becomes clear that the teacher is living vicariously through her star pupil, and that she can achieve her own professional needs only if her student wins the competition. Despite its often intense psychological drama, Terpsichore’s Captives concludes with a passionate declaration of love for ballet.
Directed by Efim Reznikov
1995, color, 52 mins., VHS
Purchase: $275 Rental: $95


Grand Prize, Russian Documentary Film Festival
Silver Hugo, Intercom Festival, Chicago
Best Video, International Film Festival Amascultura Malaposta (Portugal)
Golden FIPA Award, Biarritz (France)


"…offbeat…dramatic…"—The New York Times


"…passionately declares the absolute necessity of setting art above ego…The daily coaching sessions reveal an approach to dance that leaves no room for emotion. Will striving for perfection have a negative or positive effect? For the young dancer each lesson becomes a lesson in courage. If she loves the ballet more than herself she may succeed."—Film Society of Lincoln Center
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Disabilities

Losing It
This feature-length, cross-cultural documentary, filmed on four continents, explores the lives of people who are living with physical disability, revealing their aspirations and realities. In Russia, director Sharon Greytak, who directs from a motorized wheelchair, interviews a man and woman with cerebral palsy, who struggle for independence and opportunity in a country where even access to wheelchairs is rare. In Hong Kong, a woman who had a stroke gains great insights into the world of disabilities within a society that fosters kinetic lives, as well as alternative healing possibilities. In Brazil, a man and woman speak candidly about the subtle ways in which their disability intertwines with economic conditions, religious notions, and social expectations. An Italian artist with a rare blood disorder contrasts his life and community before being afflicted with his crippling disease with the disturbing isolation he now feels. Finally, a post-polio American woman, who battled severe social and family prejudice when she entered an interracial marriage and bore healthy children, discusses the complex web of societal assumptions about disability as it relates to marriage, childbearing, partnering responsibilities, and job status. Through her insightful and sensitive interviews and an evocative visual style, Greytak weaves a story of resilience, vulnerability and the everyday struggle to carve out a sense of purpose and worth.
Directed by Sharon Greytak
2001, color, 90 mins., VHS
Purchase: $350 Rental: $95


CINE Golden Eagle Award
Achievement Award


Superfest International Media Festival on Disabilities"…engrossing and provocative…a beautifully shot and composed film."—The Los Angeles Times


"…excellent…one of the most stimulating, illuminating films about disadvantaged people, who—in one of Greytak’s many thoughtful statements—might not have lived to adulthood 100 years ago…Some of the stories are heartbreaking, and others are profoundly uplifting."—The Hollywood Reporter


"…fascinating."—Variety
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View from the Inside:
Physical Disabilities

Focusing on two people with disabilities—Terri and Danny, both of whom use wheelchairs—this video offers an in-depth look at many aspects of living with disability. It focuses on commonly held stereotypes and practical suggestions for interacting with people with disabilities, on the job and in everyday life. Since the video addresses the disabled person’s need to be treated differently, but also the same as everybody else, it addresses the frequently overlooked "human" side of the Americans with Disabilities Act.
Produced by Sandra Martin
1999, color, 19 mins, VHS
Purchase: $99.95
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Entertainment

Dodgeball
This comedy short tells the story of Rose, a new employee at a ruthless company where, taking corporate team building to the extreme, success is based on how well you play in the weekly company dodgeball game. Combine this popular schoolyard game—one that that all of us as kids either loved or hated—with the corporate business world, and you have the essence of Dodgeball, life’s most brutal game.
Directed by Donald Bull
2001, color, 20 mins., VHS
Purchase: $39.95
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Fine Arts and Crafts

If These Walls Could Speak!: Mural Painting in Belfast
This documentary examines the tradition of both the Catholic/Nationalist and Protestant/Loyalist communities in Northern Ireland of painting huge murals on building walls, both as a way to celebrate cultural heroes or commemorate significant historical events as well as to demarcate their respective neighborhoods. Mural artists from both sides of the political divide display and discuss their works, including the contemporary struggle to claim heroic and religious symbols, the paramilitary organizations which commission the works, and a nascent trend away from sectarian murals toward more cross-community themes, which are being painted by a new generation of "aerosol artists" who work with young people from both communities.
Directed by Nancy E. du Plessis
2001, color, 26 mins., VHS
Purchase: $195 Rental: $50
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The Overbeck Sisters: A Legacy of Spirit
This video tells the story of Margaret, Hannah, Elizabeth and Mary Frances Overbeck, four sisters who rejected traditional women’s roles and in 1911 established their own pottery studio in Cambridge City, Indiana. Working from their home, they designed, produced and sold ceramic pottery and figurines, over a more than forty-year period producing thousands of individually hand-crafted pieces, no two of which were alike. The video features interviews with museum directors, ceramics experts and the present owners of the Overbeck home and studio, who recount the story of these remarkably independent and creative sisters.
Directed by Natalie Ann Richert
2002, color, 29 mins., VHS
Purchase: $195 Rental: $55
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Puppetry: Worlds of Imagination
This documentary surveys the revolutionary new developments in American puppet theater, profiling many of puppetry’s most imaginative contemporary artists, including Basil Twist, who uses bits of fabric, feathers, plastic and other materials in a 1,000-gallon tank of water to create a visually stunning underwater ballet musically accompanied by Berlioz’s "Symphonie Fantastique"; Ralph Lee, founder of the famous Greenwich Village Halloween Parade, discusses his current work designing figures for ballets and symphony orchestras and we see excerpts from his own theater company’s production, which employs puppets as vehicles for the exploration of supernatural myths and legends; Michael Curry discusses the masks and puppets he created for the Broadway production of The Lion King, as well as the Super Bowl, the Olympics and the Millennium Celebration in New York City; Cheryl Henson, daughter of Jim (The Muppets) Henson, discusses the biannual Jim Henson International Festival of Puppet Theatre as we see excerpts of some of these innovative presentations; we also visit the puppetry program at the California Institute of the Arts, including one of puppeteer Janie Geiser’s classes; and the video concludes by discussing the new directions and new ideas in puppetry and the ways it is transforming opera, music, theater and dance.
Directed by Joshua Malkin
2001, color, 44 mins., VHS
Purchase: $275 Rental: $85


*** Good "…engaging…an eye-popping tribute to contemporary puppetry’s re-emergence in the arts, after being so long consigned to the realm of children’s entertainment. Recommended."—Video Librarian


"Puppetry provides a thorough primer on the new ‘puppet people,’ a breed whose current works will take a back seat only to their future imaginations…The profiles of these masters are short, insightfully edited, and packed with plenty of information. Highly recommended."—Library Journal
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Still Life Giving: A Journey into Outsider Art
This documentary takes a look at another side of the art world, its brilliance sometimes hiding behind ragged edges and everyday innocence. In this arena, rules mean nothing and open minds are fertile ground. If we open our eyes, we can all learn important lessons about art, its place in our society, and the validity of our own creative potential. This is the world of Outsider Art, or art created by the self-taught. This video profiles three such artists: collage artist Anne Gingrich, sculptor Tim Fowler, painters Helen Brom and John Hillier, and in so doing challenges us all on our ideas and responses to the age-old question: what is art?
Directed by Bill Weaver
2001, color, 24 mins., VHS
Purchase: $175 Rental: $50
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Gay Lesbian and Gender Studies

The Most Unknowable Thing
In this unusual family portrait, filmmaker Mary Patierno focuses on her gay brother, David, recording significant events during the last years of his life. Shot over a period of five years,, the video portrays David’s relationship with his gay lover, Carlos, their breakup, Carlos’s falling ill with AIDS, followed by David’s surprising decision to marry Connie, his female chiropractor, and become stepfather to her two children. The video examines his relationship with Connie, his own struggle with AIDS, and the bizarre tragedy that struck soon after their marriage. The video’s intimate footage and unusually frank and revealing interviews tell a remarkable, real-life story, in the process revealing the inadequacy of our current definitions of family and identity.
Directed by Mary Patierno
1999, color, 57 mins., VHS
Purchase: $295 Rental: $95


Outstanding Documentary Feature
Miami Lesbian and Gay Film Festival
Outstanding Documentary Feature
Outfest
Audience Award
Reel Affirmations
Outstanding Documentary Short
Reelings


"…insightful, nuanced and moving…richly provocative…packs a surprising emotional wallop."—LA Weekly


"…remarkable…a profoundly moving meditation on family acceptance, fate and the unpredictable nature of love."—The Miami Herald


"…one of the most moving personal accounts to come out of the AIDS crisis."—Metro Weekly


"…elegant and quietly moving."—Lesbian and Gay New York


"…a moving and compelling documentary."—New York Blade
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Gerontology and Aging

View from the Inside:
Just Ordinary Days…
Personal Reflections on Living and Dying

This powerful, four-part video, as much about living as it is about dying, focuses on three terminally ill people. In Parts 1 and 2, Cindy, Fred and Clara, along with their family members and health-care and hospice professionals, openly discuss common issues surrounding death, including fears, denial, and avoiding the topic, and dying people themselves, altogether. In Parts 3 and 4, viewers are offered specific, practical ways that all of us—health-care professionals, friends, and family members alike—can better understand, comfort and support people through the dying process.
Directed by Sandra Martin
2001, color, 120 mins., VHS
Purchase: $350 Rental: $95
(60 min.-version available for $250)
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View from the Inside:
Older Adults

This video, consisting of the innermost thoughts and feelings of those in their sixties and beyond, captures the essence of what it truly means to be "old." While not ignoring such realities of aging as declining health and loneliness, this surprisingly positive video focuses on the majority of older adults, those who are living happy, healthy and independent lives, and challenges viewers to rethink their own attitudes and beliefs about growing old. Narrated in storytelling fashion by an older adult, this video is a loving testimonial to all older adults, both current and future.
Directed by Sandra Martin
1995, color, 21 mins., VHS
Purchase: $99.95


"This videotape should be shown to every gerontology student on the first day of class."—James A. Thorson, Chairman, Dept. of Gerontology, University of Nebraska at Omaha


"Dispels the stereotypes and fears too many of us have of growing older. A useful teaching tool and discussion device for patients, health professionals and students. An uplifting experience."—Cathryn Devons, M.D., Director, Geriatrics Medical Education, Mt. Sinai Medical Center, New York


"…an upbeat presentation…Most who view this pleasant video will walk away feeling refreshed, enlightened, and hopeful for their own future older life."—The Gerontologist
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View from the Inside:
Alzheimer’s Journey—The Journey Within

This informative video takes viewers through a daughter’s deepest feelings, expressed in a journal, as she watches her mother go through the initial stages of Alzheimer’s disease, and shows how those feelings eventually lead her to experience a profound change within herself. The insights shared here will help any family member in a similar situation understand and accept the common feelings of denial, shock, anger and grief, to move through the difficult early transition period, and realize that they are not alone.
Directed by Sandra Martin
1995, color, 20 mins., VHS
Purchase: $99.95


"…dispels a number of prevalent aging myths…a powerful journey of discovery."—Library Journal


"I have reviewed hundreds of videotapes on Alzheimer’s disease, and have never seen a tape as positive as this one!"—Deborah Marks Conley, R.N.C., M.S.N., Gerontological Clinical Nurse Specialist, Omaha, Nebraska


"…an excellent video for members of a family experiencing a similar journey…This videotape would be appropriate for sensitizing caregiving staff in facilities and/or home care settings to the intense emotions of family members."—The Gerontologist

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Holocaust Studies

After Auschwitz: Battle for the Holocaust
Why exactly does the Holocaust loom so large in our collective consciousness? To what political purposes has this memory been put? Filmed in the U.S., Europe and Israel, this controversial documentary charts the evolution of our idea of the Holocaust, from 1945 to the present, critically examines the international campaign for restitution, and ponders the relationship between the Holocaust and the contemporary politics of the Middle East. Featuring interviews with Dr. Henry Kissinger, Peter Novick, Norman Finkelstein, Gulie Ne’eman Arad, Elan Steinberg, and Elie Wiesel, among others, this video will challenge conventional historical viewpoints and stimulate debate over whether or not the lessons of the Holocaust have truly been learned.
Directed by Paul Yule
2001, color, 50 mins., VHS
Purchase: $275 Rental: $95


"…a brave and accomplished documentary…one of those programmes which messes with your head just when you think you’ve finally decided what you think about all the Big Issues in the world. ‘Challenging’ doesn’t even begin to cover it."—The Guardian (London)


"…provocative…courageous…reflects a genuine debate raging within (particularly American) Jewry. It also left our minds fizzing with thoughts and counter-thoughts, ideas and objections."—The Daily Telegraph (London)
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Porraimos: Europe’s Gypsies in the Holocaust
This historical video chronicles the Roma (Gypsy) Holocaust—Porraimos, or "the devouring." It is the first American documentary to expose how the pseudo-science of eugenics was used to persecute not only Jews, but also Gypsies. To the Nazis, Gypsies’ dark skin and nomadic ways made them "lives not worthy of life." Using interviews with Austrian, Czech and German Gypsy survivors (including the Jewish artist who was ordered by Joseph Mengele to paint portraits of Gypsy prisoners at Auschwitz), as well as photographs and films from the Reich Department of Racial Hygiene, this video reveals the oppression of the Gypsies—their registration and segregation, their sterilization, the medical experiments, and their eventual murder. Porraimos remembers Gypsy victims of the Holocaust—victims whose persecution has been all but forgotten.
Directed by Alexandra Isles
2001, color and B&W, 57 mins., VHS
Purchase: $295 Rental: $95


**** (Excellent Rating) "Alexandra Isles’ gripping documentary should rightly take a revered place alongside the more extensive body of work detailing the Jewish Holocaust. Highly recommended."—Video Librarian
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Irish Studies

Out of the Ashes: Northern Ireland’s Fragile Peace
This video, part of a series of documentaries on conflict resolution in the world’s trouble spots, offers personal and historical views of the unrest in Northern Ireland from the mid-Sixties to the present day. Shot on location in Derry, Belfast and Dublin, the video features interviews with political and religious leaders on both sides of the conflict, former members of paramilitary organizations and former prisoners, women who have had to assume responsibility for everyday work to maintain family and community life, and Catholic and Protestant children.
Directed by John Michalczyk
1998, color, 56 mins., VHS
Purchase: $295 Rental: $95
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Jewish Studies

The Jewish Steppe
This historical video documents the tragic history of an agrarian commune established in the Soviet Union during the Twenties. Although the 1917 Russian Revolution abolished many previous restrictions on Jewish life, Jews remained the victims of pogroms and other violence during the ensuing Civil War. In 1924, 30,000 Jewish families decided to become farmers but the only land the new government could make available to them was on the Crimean steppe, an area notorious for its hot, arid summers, unfertile soil, and slight rainfall, with the only water located deep underground. Nevertheless, entire Jewish families, including the elderly and children, made heroic efforts to settle the area, build housing, and engage in collective farming. Within two years the area was recognized as the Soviet Union’s first Jewish District, complete with its own schools and colleges. This unusual social experiment came to an end due to Stalinist repression in the late Thirties and, following the devastation of WWII, the Jewish settlements were never reconstructed.
Directed by Valery Ovchinnikov
2001, black and white, 16 mins., VHS
Purchase: $99.95

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Latin American Studies

Growing Up on the Streets: 12 Years Later
In 1988, filmmakers Luc Cote and Robbie Hart went to Cusco, Peru, to make a documentary about the life of the city_ _s street kids, runaway children from dysfunctional families or youngsters abandoned by their parents, who struggle to survive on their own. Twelve years later, the filmmakers return to Peru, hoping to find the same children and to see what they_ _ve become. As Luc and Robbie do some local _ _detective work_ _ and eventually locate Carlos, Angel, Sonia and Willy, contemporary interviews with these young people are blended with footage of them as children twelve years earlier. It soon becomes clear how each has been emotionally shaped, even traumatized, by their difficult life experiences and how they continue to struggle today with many of the same personal and social issues.
Directed by Luc Cote and Robbie Hart
2000, color 52 mins., VHS
Spanish dialog with English subtitles
Purchase: $275 Rental: $95


Prix Jeunesse, North_South Competition
First Prize, Social Communications Office
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Haunted Land
In this feature-length documentary, two paths cross on a tortuous descent into Guatemala’s tragic past: that of Mateo Pablo, Maya survivor of one of many massacres that took place during the country’s recent civil war, and Daniel Hernández-Salazar, Guatemalan artist and photographer, whose work deals with local human-rights violations. Together they travel to a remote site in the highlands where the community of Petanac once stood. Mateo grew up and lived there until 1982, when his family and neighbors were tortured and murdered by the Guatemalan Army, whose soldiers later burned the village to the ground.
But memory lingers. At Petanac and other Maya communities across Guatemala, survivors gather to bear witness as forensic experts unearth the mass graves of their loved ones. Once the dirt has been patiently removed by teams of archaeologists, the bones found in clandestine cemeteries tell their own mute story of agony and terror. In a series of moving interviews, Mateo and other survivors of the massacre at Petanac bear witness to the slaughter of family members and friends during one of the bloodiest periods in Central American history. Interspersed throughout the film are many of Hernández-Salazar’s photos—compelling meditations on death and the life-affirming forces of hope, desire, longing and resistance that counteract it—which have become a symbol of the quest for truth about the atrocities committed in Guatemala.
Directed by Mary Ellen Davis
2001, color, 74 mins., VHS
French, Spanish and Chuj dialog with English subtitles
Purchase: $350 Rental: $95
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In Cane for Life
Shot during the seven months of the Brazilian sugar cane harvest, this video portrays what may be the last generation of the nation’s 800,000 sugar cane cutters (an environmental law approved by the National Congress has ruled that by 2015 practically all cane harvesting must be mechanized). Today, however, cane cutters, both men and women, each manually cut over 38,000 pounds of sugar cane a day. Featuring interviews with these rural workers, in which they discuss their hopes and dreams, the video also documents their challenging daily work routine.
Directed by Jorge Wolney Attala
2001, color, 69 mins., VHS Purchase: $350 Rental: $95
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Los Pastores
Portrays the revival of Los Pastores (The Shepherd’s Play), an ancient Christmas morality play that has long been part of Hispanic folk traditions in the American Southwest. Originally brought to the New World by the Spanish conquistadores and Catholic missionaries, Los Pastores evolved from a strict liturgical drama whose purpose was to teach morality to the indigenous Indian population into a sometimes bawdy and comedic folk play that went out of favor in the twentieth century. The video shows the reenactment of the play by the Sangre de Cristos Liturgies Theater Company at a small church in New Mexico. It features scenes of the play, interviews with local townspeople, plus archival photos and readings of letters from settlers who documented performances of the play at the turn of the century.
Directed by Judy Chaikin
1997, color, 28 mins., VHS
Purchase: $195 Rental: $55


"…a delightful film…could be used for units on multiculturalism, with Spanish classes, or to illustrate Hispanic culture and tradition during the Christmas season."—School Library Journal
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La Raza Unida
This video documents the first national convention in El Paso, Texas in September 1972 of the La Raza Unida Party, a third political party whose membership consisted primarily of Mexican-American citizens. It features speeches, caucus meetings and lively discussions between some of the era’s leading Chicano leaders—including ‘Corky’ Gonzalez, Reies Lopez Tijerina, Raul Ruiz, and Jose Angel Gutierrez—as well as debates about the National Party Platform and the election of Jose Angel Gutierrez as La Raza Unida’s National Party Chairman.
Directed by Jesus Salvador Trevino
2002, color and B&W, 27 mins., VHS
English and Spanish dialog
Purchase: $99.95
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Sacrificio: Who Betrayed Che Guevara
At 1:10 p.m. on October 9th, 1967, Sgt. Teran stepped into the room where Che Guevara was behind held and shot him. After a year of guerrilla warfare in Bolivia with only a few fighters, the legendary revolutionary leader was now dead. The one person singled out as ultimately responsible for Guevara’s capture was his former lieutenant, Ciro Bustos. When captured earlier by the Bolivian Army, he drew portraits of Che and his men. Since that time he has been living quietly in Europe. In this investigative documentary, Bustos for the first time tells his story. His version of those events, combined with interviews with historians, former CIA agents and Bolivian army officers, raises serious questions about how history is written.
Directed by Erik Gandini and Tarik Saleh
2001, color, 60 mins., DVD
Purchase: VHS $295 orDVD $99.95
Rental: $95
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Literature and Language Arts

James Joyce: The Trials of Ulysses
This video tells the story of Joyce’s epic novel, Ulysses, his most famous creation and certainly the most renowned work of fiction of the twentieth century. Filmed in Zurich, Trieste, New York and Dublin, the video portrays Joyce’s own trials as a writer, his long struggle with his magnum opus, and his persistence in trying to have his "buke" made available to a mass audience. Upon publication in 1921, Ulysses was accused of pornography and obscenity, and it was banned in England and America. Featuring interviews with well-known authors, academics, Joycean scholars and surviving relatives, James Joyce: The Trials of Ulysses recounts the gestation and birth of this classic novel and its growth to maturity. It also captures aspects of Joyce’s own life, the influence on his work of his lifelong partner, Nora Barnacle, his feelings about writing, and his struggle with a cherished masterpiece.
Directed by Ian Graham
2000, color, 52 mins., VHS
Purchase: $275 Rental: $85

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Kafe Kuumba: Welcome to Open Mike
This entertaining documentary features a variety of African-American poets from all over America, who have gathered to perform at Kafe Kuumba in Indianapolis, a local cultural center sponsored by the Midtown Writers Association. Performances by these talented spoken-word poets are blended with interviews in which they discuss their creative influences, the importance of poetry as a form of social expression as well as entertainment, the use of jazz and traditional African drumming as musical accompaniment, and what writing poetry means to them and the community.
Directed by Steven Toney
2001, color, 57 mins., VHS
Purchase: $ 99.95
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The Marquis de Sade: Pornographer or Prophet?
This provocative and emotionally unsettling video examines the realities behind the myth of the Marquis de Sade (1740-1814), the French author who, charged with numerous sexual offenses, spent half of his adult life in prisons or asylums. His obscene romances, such as Justine and The 120 Days of Sodom, written clandestinely during the French Revolution, argue that sexually deviant and criminal acts are natural since they exist in nature. Today his writings are felt to have foreshadowed much modern psychological thought and to reflect aspects of our own troubled society. But was he a prophet, or merely a pornographer? A misogynist or a founding father of feminism? Does he deserve his reputation as a major literary figure and revolutionary thinker? Featuring excerpts from several film adaptations of Sade’s work, plus interviews with scholars, critics, biographers and historians, including David Coward, Andrea Dworkin, Camille Paglia, Francine du Plessix Gray, Richard Seaver, and Neil Shaeffer, this video reveals the various and often conflicting interpretations of Sade and his writings. (Note: This video includes nudity and graphic sexual imagery.)
Directed by Paul Yule
2001, color, 50 mins., VHS
Purchase: $275 Rental: $95
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Mid East Studies

Judgement Day
This video, by comparing the current Israeli/Palestinian conflict with the previous struggle for liberation and democracy in South Africa, makes a universal statement about war and the effects of war on young people on both sides of the conflicts. The video first focuses on the experiences of two young South Africans who discuss how they were brutalized in the South African conflict and who explain their current search for healing. After tracing the 1967 occupation by Israel of the Palestinian territories and examining the viewpoint of the Israeli settler communities, Judgement Day examines the consequences and perspectives of concerned Israeli citizens and Palestinians affected by the current situation of "closure" and "collective punishment." Judgement Day interweaves these two stories, providing reference points in South Africa’s history of apartheid that resonate with the Israeli/Palestinian conflict today.
Directed by Kevin Harris
2001, color, 59 mins., VHS
Purchase: $295 Rental: $95


"This film may make us uncomfortable. But there is value in what it says. If we are to emerge from this conflict with our humanity intact, both sides—Israelis and Palestinians—will have to look honestly and courageously at themselves and what has been done in their name."—South African Jewish Report
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Performing Arts

Sing! Healing, Community, Celebration
How many times have you heard people, even yourself, say, "I can’t sing," or "I’m tone deaf"? Ninety-nine percent of the time, this is a fallacy, a misconception that can be dispelled in less than five minutes. This documentary profiles three women who are reviving a musical legacy, a birthright, which so many of have lost—the simple act of singing. Shivon Robinsong is director of the Gettin’ Higher Choir, a no-audition choir whose members, most convinced they can’t carry a tune, are soon performing at live concerts to sellout crowds, and in the process are learning as much about community as about music. Gina Sala has overcome what might be perceived as the limitations of a high-pitched voice to develop a distinctive singing style, filtered through fourteen different languages, and who also works with teenagers to overcome their own musical and vocal insecurities. Laurel Murphy, who has returned to singing after a decade-long hiatus through the inspiration of her mentor, improvisational stylist Rhiannon, now performs publicly, teaches weekly classes in improv, and organizes SongRise, an annual public improvisational chorus that sings in the New Year. The video vividly demonstrates how these women are breathing new life, creativity, and health into their communities, their culture, and the world at large, and gives viewers a fresh new perspective on the artist that lies within each of us.
Directed by Bill Weaver
2000, color, 52 mins., VHS
Purchase: $275 Rental: $95


"If you mumble along under your breath when it’s time for hymns or anthems, and if you sing out loud only when you’re alone in the car and the radio is going full blast, then this video is for you…there’s a whole alternative world of music-making out there that’s tuneful, musically uninhibited, and remarkably liberating."—The Toronto Star


"Watching Sing! Healing, Community, Celebration,, even I felt my cracked, song-shy voice itching to join the on-screen chorus…the best way to enjoy this fine feature isn’t slouched in front of the boob tube, mute as a channel-changer. Instead, crank up the volume, lift your head, and sing along."—Monday Magazine
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The Small Poppies
This documentary features Academy Award-wining actor Geoffrey Rush (Shine, Elizabeth, Shakespeare in Love) and other members of his Company B theater group as they stage The Small Poppies, a play about a child’s first day at school, for an audience of children at the 2000 Dublin Theater Festival. In this witty and insightful allegorical play, six adult actors play some twenty-odd roles, including a group of five-year-olds as well as their teachers and parents. Geoffrey Rush stars as Clint, an excitable and hapless five-year-old, who joins new classmates—including best friends, jokers and bullies—on their simultaneously exciting and terrifying first day of school. The play is alternately hilarious and emotionally touching, and often breathtaking in its revelation of universal truths. In addition to scenes from the play, the video features a look back at the play’s first presentation in the mid-Eighties, the rehearsals for the current production, interviews with the director, playwright, and actors as well as many of the young children in the audience.
Directed by Robert Mac
2001, color, 55 mins., VHS
Purchase: $295 Rental: $95


***1/2 "A wonderful piece of work, this is enthusiastically recommended for anyone who loves the magic of the theatre."—Video Librarian
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Photography

O. Winston Link: Trains That Passed in the Night
O. Winston Link (1914-2001) was America’s greatest photographer of the romance of the steam engine, as documented in his book, Steam, Steel & Stars: America’s Last Steam Railroad. His extraordinary images were made at night, using elaborate flash equipment, capturing trains in action on the Norfolk and Western, the last steam railroad line in the U.S., during the 1950s. This video takes a journey with Link, then in his latest Seventies, along the tracks of the N&W, through Virginia and West Virginia, as he recounts the experience of setting up and taking his remarkable photos. He revisits the sites of many of his most famous photos, encountering some of the people who appeared in them, and in the process celebrates a bygone era of rural America.
Directed by Paul Yule
1990, color, 52 mins., VHS
Purchase: $275 Rental: $95
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Russian and Eastern Europe

Citizens
This video portrays human dimensions of Poland’s Solidarity movement in 1980-81 that were obscured by Cold-War rhetoric: the efforts of workers, artists and intellectuals who joined together to create a thriving civil society within a totalitarian state. Solidarity activists describe how they learned that to protect their own interests they had to fight for the interests of Polish society as a whole. Their self-governing trade union won the trust and support of virtually all segments of society by providing the only available channel for the local grass-roots initiatives, open debate, and democratic action that ultimately led to non-violent systemic change in Poland and beyond.
Directed by Richard Adams
1986, color, 58 mins., VHS
Purchase: $250 Rental: $95
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Urban Studies

More Than Flowers
This video tells the story of community gardens in New York City, which flourished during the Seventies when residents of deteriorating neighborhoods removed garbage from abandoned lots, obtained temporary leases from the city, and planted gardens. As the gardens developed through volunteer community effort, they became valued sites for local families and their children to socialize, relax, and enjoy nature. In the mid-Nineties, however, the city administration began selling these lots to developers, and bulldozing community gardens, which destroyed both the gardens and the community organizations they involved. The video features interviews with community gardeners throughout New York City and archival footage from the last two decades of the growth and ongoing destruction of the community gardens movement.
Directed by Laura Beer
2001, color, 29 mins., VHS
Purchase: $195 Rental: $50
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Women's studies

Bad Girl
In a Los Angeles film studio, the cameras roll on an X-rated film, and in the director’s chair sits a woman. In New York and San Francisco, companies created by women market hard-core videos to the female consumer. In France, women filmmakers such as Catherine Breillat produce critically acclaimed films shown worldwide but which some call "pornographic." One of the most popular porn websites in that country is the creation of a woman. In Denmark, a woman directs the new "Pussy Power" porn subsidiary of Lars von Trier’s Zentropa film company. These women are claiming the right to pornography—made by women for women. They reject the censorship called for by feminists in the Seventies and demand the freedom to explore their sexual desires in sexually explicit films. Are they simply businesswomen who want their share of one of the most lucrative film and video markets? Are they avant-garde feminists? Advocates of new sexual relationships? Featuring selected film clips and interviews with feminist authors, filmmakers, anthropologists, sexologists, porn producers and activists—including Linda Williams, Luce Irigary, Benoîte Groult, Catherine Breillat, Nina Hartley, Carol Queen, Annie Sprinkle, Virginie Despentes, Bernard Arcand, and Jane Hamilton, among others—Bad Girl gets down and dirty with women who, from Hollywood to Paris, from Cannes to Las Vegas, from Montreal to San Francisco, are giving pornography a new name. (Note: This video includes sexually explicit scenes and is intended for mature viewers only.)
Directed by Marielle Nitoslawska
2001, color, 58 mins., VHS
Purchase: $295 Rental: $95
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In and Out of Focus
This video is about women in the film business and how they balance children, love lives and career—or how they don’t. When a female filmmaker discovers she is unexpectedly pregnant, her life is turned upside down, as she struggles to balance family and career. Filmed over a period of five years, the story evolves from a personal journey into an exploration of female filmmakers in general. The video features interviews with some of the most successful women in the film industry, including, among others, directors Mimi Leder (Deep Impact) and Claudia Weill (Girlfriends); producers Gail Katz (The Perfect Storm) and Jana Sue Memel (So I Married an Axe Murderer); screenwriter Diane Fine (Man on a Wire) and Anne Coates, editor of numerous films, from Lawrence of Arabia to Erin Brockovich. The resulting tapestry of personal stories illustrates the delicate balance that many modern women are forced to consider, no matter what choices they make.
Directed by Jacqueline Liebman
2000, color, 66 mins., VHS
Purchase: $295 Rental: $95


"Recommended for high schools or colleges with classes on women’s studies and/or feminism."—Library Journal
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Dancing With My Father
What do daughters learn from their fathers about men? This video is an intimate family view of how adult love is often shaped by what a child learns at home. With camera rolling, filmmaker Marcia Rocik sets out to make a point about her father’s emotional guardedness—that it was hurtful, that it had a ripple effect which extended into her own marriage. Her father’s struggle to meet her halfway and yield to her questions while the world is in effect, watching is the surprise of this family drama. WIth his help, Rock combines self-analysis and dynastic saga as she traces her family demons from a tiny Jewish community in Slovakia, to the immigrant neighborhoods of Cleveland, Ohio, during the early twentieth century. In the process, she finally learns to dance with her father and not around him.
Directed by Marcia Rock
2002 color, 54 mins., VHS
Purchase: $295 Rental: $95
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